Articles

Meter and Orifice Sizing

PIPE-FLO® Professional version 16.1’s new orifice and meter sizing functionality allows users to quickly determine the appropriate device size needed based on desired requirements. Meter and orifice calculations are performed in PIPE-FLO® in accordance to the following standards: ASME MFC-3M-2004 Measurement of Fluid Flow in Pipes Using Orifice, Nozzle, and Venturi, as well as ASME MFC-14M-2003 Small Bore Precision Orifice Meters.
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Using the K, Cv, Kv Calculator

Accuracy of hydraulic calculations is critical for the proper design, operation, and determination of cost for many types of piping systems in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. It is crucial that the engineer understand and apply the correct formula to prevent costly mistakes in the sizing and selection of equipment, operating within safety limits, and avoiding unnecessary modifications later in the process. One aspect that leads to mistakes is the misuse of coefficients that characterize the hydraulic performance of devices that have a fluid flowing through them.
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Versatility of the Gradient Colors Feature in PIPE-FLO® Professional

PIPE-FLO® Professional is an excellent tool to model complex piping systems commonly found in many industries, including chilled water and ultra-pure water systems used in data centers, manufacturing, chemical processing, HVAC, pharmaceutical, and other industrial and commercial facilities. The intuitive user interface makes it easy to quickly model these complex systems. PIPE-FLO® then performs a hydraulic analysis, generates messages, and displays calculated results for the user to evaluate.
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Modeling a Strainer

A strainer is a device installed in a piping system which provides a means for mechanically removing foreign particles from a flowing fluid. Most strained particles are in the size range between 40 micron and 1 inch, and are typically removed by using a perforated, mesh, or wedge wire straining element. For some processes, the particles are undesirable and the purpose of straining these particulates is to protect downstream mechanical equipment such as pumps, heat exchangers, control valves, flow meters and spray nozzles from the detrimental effects of flow debris. It also serves to prevent this debris from ending up in the final product in some manufacturing cases. Other processes may require straining because the particles, not the process fluids, are the desired product.
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Understanding the Distinction Between Total, Static and Dynamic Pressure

When discussing a piping system, the term "pressure" is often used to describe a key fluid property that plays an important role in the operation of equipment like pumps, control valves, tanks and vessels and other devices. However, like many terms used in engineering, there are nuances in meaning that must be taken into account to avoid miscommunication, confusion and costly mistakes. Quite often, key qualifiers that distinguish between total pressure, static pressure and dynamic pressure are not used. Sometimes the distinction is important, just as the difference between mass flow rate and volumetric flow rate must be made to be concise when discussing flow rate.
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